Monday, January 20, 2014

Light Rye Bread with Caraway Seeds

Ever notice how one thing in the kitchen often leads to another? Since I picked up caraway seeds for my Multi-Seeded Rolls the next thing to try was this Light Rye Bread. We all loved it served with butter at dinner, but this would be great for sandwiches and I'm eating a slice toasted as I type:@) It's a sturdy loaf that I'd say is halfway between white bread soft and deli rye hard. The hardest part is trying to grind the caraway seeds... I"m guessing a coffee grinder would work, my mortar and pestle didn't do a very good job although I did still end up with a nice caraway flavor.
 Are the air bubbles up top from not punching down my dough sufficiently? Also, why doesn't this loaf have a nice rounded top? I gave it plenty of time to rise and used regular active dry yeast (not quick rising)... Any tips from bread bakers?

Light Rye Bread with Caraway Seeds-from One Perfect Bite
4-1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast
2 cups warm water 
1/2 cup warm milk 
3 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons sugar 
2 tablespoons shortening
2 tablespoons molasses
1 tablespoons salt
1 cup light rye flour
5 - 5-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon ground caraway seeds
2 tablespoons caraway seeds
  1. Place warm water in large bowl, add yeast and let dissolve.
  2. Add milk, sugars, shortening, molasses and salt. Add rye flour and 2 cups all-purpose flour, beating until smooth. 
  3. Stir in ground caraway and caraway seeds and gradually add enough remaining all-purpose flour to form a soft dough.
  4. Turn onto a floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic, about 6-8 minutes. 
  5. Place in a large bowl coated with cooking spray, turning once to coat top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 hour. 
  6. Punch dough down. Turn onto a lightly floured surface; divide into two portions. Shape into two loaves. 
  7. Place each loaf in a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan coated with cooking spray. Cover and let rise until doubled, about 30 minutes.
  8. Bake at 375 degrees for 30-35 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from pans to wire racks to cool. 
Eat well and have a happy day:@)

17 comments:

  1. Rye is my favorite bread, followed closely by sourdough. I've heard that rye is one of the harder breads to make. I'm not a baker so I can't help with the rising or the round top, but I do know a coffee grinder does a great job of chopping seeds.

    Lynn, if it tastes good, I would be a happy girl.
    Sam

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  2. Looks the perfect shape and texture for some really good sandwiches!

    Best,
    Bonnie

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  3. Sounds and looks wonderful. The only bread I've ever made is beer bread that came in a bottle from Hallmark. It was just okay.

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  4. we grew and dried our own caraway seeds (when i was a kid) and my mom made some great homemade rye. :)

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  5. Lynn, a coffee grinder would be perfect for pulverizing the caraway. The bubbles are the result of letting the bread rise a bit to long and you can get a more rounded top by using a smaller pan. With rye bread flavor is everything and I don't pay much attention to appearance., so don't stress. Your bread looks wonderful tome. Have a great dayt. Blessings...Mary

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  6. Looks like we are both craving the same thing. I have never tried rye bread before. Bread is definitely my weakness!

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  7. I think your bread looks great Lynn. I'd love a turkey sandwich with Havarti, avocado, tomato and basil aioli please! Oh, and a little bacon would be nice too!

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  8. Rye bread is one of our favorites! I never grind my caraway seeds though, never thought about it. I have found that rye breads take longer to rise than other breads, my Pumpernickel Rye takes twice as long to rise as my Whole Wheat.

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  9. I love rye bread, but I don't have your energy Lynn, I buy mine at Publix deli~I bet your kitchen smells amazing while you're baking this!
    Jenna

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  10. Oh I'm glad your tried Mary's rye bread. I saw that recipe, too, and thought I'd like to make it. There's nothing quite like the aroma of fresh bread baking in the kitchen. I'll bet your boys loved it! xo

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  11. I love rye breads! I bought the cheapest coffee grinder I could find at Wal-Mart for fourteen dollars and change to grind my flax seeds, does a fantastic job! I have never ground caraway seeds for rye bread though. I love to chew the whole seed while I am eating the bread.

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  12. Try it toasted and with peanut butter on top...YUMMO!!
    I'm no expert but I was told that it was wise to add some gluten to any rye breads I wanted to make in my bread machine. You can buy just plain gluten.
    If you think about it, all the loaves of Jewish Rye in the stores are all sort of flat & oval in shape. They don't rise much either.
    I get it tasted GREAT!! We love rye bread!!!

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  13. Rye is my favorite bread, especially for corned beef reubens ;o) I love it toasted like you do!

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  14. I love rye bread and I also use caraway seeds in Irish Soda bread! I read that it counteracts the "gassy" effects of the cabbage in corned beef and cabbage :)

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  15. Yum, Lynn, I'd love a ham and cheese on rye with stone ground mustard and lettuce for lunch today! Don't tell Earl. Linda

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  16. Rye toast is the best!!! Butter and jelly for me.
    It looks wonderful to me. I am lazy. I use my bread machine to make dough and then bake it in the oven. pam

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